Tag Archives: violin

Proto Jazz

21 Nov

Library of Congress has a nice article on Ragtime that raises the fascinating topic of of polyrhythm as both African inspired but also found in the jigs and reels played by immigrants from the British Isles in the Appalachian regions of the US South. https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200035811

The wiki entry on Contradanze/Habanera is also a very interesting read, on the Afro-Cuban origins of proto-jazz styles. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contradanza

Another interesting musical form of proto jazz is the “Cakewalk”. Need to read more about this!

Frederick Douglass…violinist?

10 Nov

According to the National Park Service at the Washington DC Frederick Douglass Historical Site:

Douglass played the violin for his grandchildren and guests when they visited Cedar Hill. He frequently performed for his grandchildren after supper and before their bedtime….Douglass would appear in the door leading from the hall or West Parlor into the dining room with his violin in hand. He taught his grandchildren slave songs he learned as a young slave. The grandchildren sang and clapped their hands while Douglass tapped his feet….

https://www.nps.gov/museum/exhibits/douglass/exb/homeinWashington/FRDO2505_violin.html

In the words of Dr. Douglass himself:

“I sometimes (at long intervals) try my old violin; but after all, the music of the past and of imagination is sweeter than any my unpracticed and unskilled bow can produce. So I lay my dear, old fiddle aside, and listen to the soft, silent, distant music of other days, which, in the hush of my spirit, I still find lingering somewhere in the mysterious depths of my soul.”


Holland, Frederic May. Frederick Douglass: The Colored Orator (1895 edition), p. 335.

Frederick Douglass listens to his grandson Joseph Douglass, also a violinist:

(Library of Congress)

Fourth Grade Fabulous

26 Mar

I wrote this tune many years ago for fourth grade beginning string orchestra, and recently revised it a little bit, incorporating changes that are helpful to first year string players. Here’s a pdf download for anyone with a beginning string orchestra or chamber group looking for some accessible rep. It features scalar, unison melodies, and a simple harmonic progression. The parts are grouped into two: upper strings (violin & viola) and lower strings (cello & bass). There’s some call and response to encourage listening across the ensemble. String crossings occur over open strings, and fingerings are included in helpful places. There are no slurs. This tune is correlated with the end of the Essential Elements Vol. 1 series.

https://payhip.com/b/nhlI


Sensible Position Names for Cello

2 Mar

I’ve always felt that if I can’t understand something myself, I can’t really use it as a musician, and I certainly can’t teach it. This is how I’ve felt for a long time about the standard position naming system for the left hand on cello.

The system widely in use, for example in the Suzuki Method, by Samuel Applebaum in the Beautiful Music series, by Rick Mooney in all his otherwise excellent books, is totally mystifying.

I’ve been using my own system of sensible position names with my students for about 10 years now, with much success. When we talk about positions, I get a smile and a nod of real comprehension, rather than the uh-huh and dull eyes of non-comprehension. I even get laughs as my intermediate students read the standard position names written in their music, translate them immediately to their sensible names, and ask jokingly “Why would they ever call that fourth position??!”

I took some photos of my left hand on the cello fingerboard (actually, my wife was the photographer), and illustrated the sensible names for the positions on one sheet. I then notated all the fingering possibilities for the first 6 positions on the A and D string. Finally, I correlated the sensible position names to their first introduction in the Suzuki books for cello, volumes 1 – 3. That way, a teacher or student can easily look up the sensible name for a position when it’s first introduced in the excellent sequenced repertoire of the Suzuki method. This pdf is available for download here.

A little more about why the standard system is confusing: [Warning: this will get a little technical.]

“Second Position” seems to describe a range of possible positions. Not particularly helpful for aspiring cellists. For example, it can mean the position where the 1st finger falls on C on the A string, or the position where it falls on C#. “Third Position” seems to refer to the position where the 1st finger falls on D on the A string, and “Fourth Position” to the position where 1st finger falls on E. What then should we call the position where 1st finger calls on D#? Is it “Third Position?” Is this same position called “Fourth Position” when the note is spelled Eb in the key? I wouldn’t wish this conundrum on my worst enemy. Maybe there’s a key to understanding what’s going on, and I just don’t get it. If there’s a cellist out there who gets it, please help! In the meantime, I’ll be using my sensible position names.



Oh Shenandoah Arrangement

30 Jan

I made an arrangement for my middle school string orchestra of one of my favorite folk songs of all time, Oh Shenandoah.  It’s from around the time of the American Civil War, and the lyrics are beautiful.  I recorded a demo of the recording for cello quartet in case the students wanted to hear it.  The photo is from Lake Onalaska, about 5 hours north of Chicago in Wisconsin.

Download the sheet music here.

Paver Acoustic Ep Release!

3 Jun

http://thepaver.bandcamp.com/releases

Check out Capolavoro, featuring acoustic string quartet versions of some Paver songs.   Recorded at Soapbox with The Paver and Emma Dayhuff on bass and Becca Wilcox on viola!

 

 

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